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Philadelphia Social Security Disability Law Blog

When does a person with a spine injury qualify for SSDI?

Serious accidents can happen in the blink of an eye, without any notice. In these cases, people may not be able to react quickly enough to avoid getting hurt. Workplace accidents, falls, car accidents and other accidents can all lead to injuries that keep people out of work. In particular, spinal cord injuries can be devastating.

The inability to work can create serious financial strain as people try to recover from spinal injuries. Spinal injuries are often severe and can cause permanent damage. In many cases, years of rehabilitation is necessary for people to try to get back to where they were before the injury. During this time, people may wonder if they qualify for social security disability benefits.

Support network and SSDI can improve life for some

People struggling with mental illness in Pennsylvania face an uphill battle with their disease. People need to overcome large challenges just to live day-to-day. For many working is out of the question, since they struggle just to meet their basic needs.

Having a supportive network of help can make all the difference for people who are living with mental disorders including schizophrenia. With the right advocates, people can have success with their medications, find housing and live as normal of a life as possible. This support system can ensure that if people discontinue their medication that they are kept safe and receive proper medical attention. Without this support system, those with mental illnesses and disorders can easily end up living on the streets or in mental health facilities.

Disabled children may benefit from SSI in Pennsylvania

Cancer has the potential to become a terrible, debilitating disease which can leave many people unable to work and function in society in Pennsylvania or any other state. It can be particularly problematic when children are hit with debilitating diseases or injuries, as the children are dependent upon their parents, who will likely be struggling financially to afford the necessary treatment. However, parents in this situation may be able to obtain some monetary assistance via Supplemental Security Income. SSI is a vital program offered through the Social Security Administration.

If a child is suffering from a disabling condition, such as cancer or a serious injury, SSI may be able to provide some financial help in paying for ongoing medical bills. However, this option is only available for families who fulfill the required conditions. The first condition is that the child's disability is expected to last for at least 12 months, continuously. Next, the family must have a low-income level, as well as few resources available.

Differences between SSDI and SSI payments

When you become disabled there can be a lot of concerns. You can be worried about how you are going to support yourself or your family and meet your everyday needs. All while you are worrying about if and when you'll ever be able to return to work.

The Social Security Administration has programs to help Americans when they cannot financially support themselves because of a disability. However, these programs can be difficult understand especially without the right help. In particular, it can be difficult to understand the difference between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income.

Fight for your right to Social Security Disability benefits

Social Security Disability benefits are a lifeline for many Pennsylvania families. Disabled adults and children count on this income to help meet all the financial obligations they have while they are unable to work. For many people SSD benefits are one of the sole ways that they support themselves. Without this income, some people literally cannot afford basic necessities including housing or food.

However, SSD benefits can be difficult to obtain. People often need to provide specific documentation with their application in order to get approval for benefits from the Social Security Administration. Often, these initial applications can be denied by the SSA for a variety of reasons.

What do you need to prove to get SSDI for schizophrenia?

In this day and age, many people understand the complexities of mental illness and mental disorders. People understand the importance of helping these individuals and proving the right environment for them to grow and achieve their goals. In the past, many of these people were hidden away and institutionalized. However, today, many are integrated into society.

In order to function in today's society, people with mental disorders -- including schizophrenia -- need to be able to meet their basic needs. This means they need to have the financial resources available to pay for their housing, food, clothing and medical care. Since many mental disorders prevent these individuals from working, social security disability benefits are often available.

Social Security disability can affect retirement benefits

There are many nuances to the rules and regulations related to obtaining benefits from the various programs administered by the Social Security Administration. Receiving benefits from Social Security disability is no exception in Pennsylvania or any other state. Millions of individuals in the United States rely on disability benefits for their daily survival. However, many may be worried about how their benefits will be affected after retirement.

Many are worried that their disability benefits will be discontinued once they reach retirement age. Although this may be the case for many long-term policies for disability in the private market, this is not so for Social Security disability benefits. Alternatively, these benefits are automatically converted into retirement benefits once retirement age is reached. Also, the amount of the benefits received will remain the same per month as it had been before reaching the age of retirement.

Many eligible elderly are not receiving SSI benefits

Senior citizens are some of the most vulnerable individuals in society. Social Security is one of the few programs operated by the federal government which is aimed at financially helping the elderly. However, it seems that millions of elderly people are currently living in poverty without any financial help from the federal government. Although many in Pennsylvania are eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), they are not receiving these benefits.

SSI is different from what is known as disability benefits. Despite being operated by the Social Security Administration, the SSI program does not fund benefits through Social Security taxes that are paid by workers. Instead, SSI is funded via income taxes from businesses as well as individuals. In order to be eligible for SSI, one must either be over the age of 65, disabled or blind.

Social Security disability can affect retirement benefits

Social Security is designed to aid those who are unable to earn enough income to live due to certain circumstances. This monetary assistance is reserved for those who are retired or are disabled. However, many in Pennsylvania are still confused about how obtaining benefits from Social Security disability will affect their retirement benefits.

Disability and retirement benefits are linked within the current Social Security system. When a person needs to collect disability benefits before he or she retires, it can affect how one’s available retirement benefits are calculated. The amount of benefits is calculated based upon the accumulation of benefits during a 35-year employment history. However, for those who have been disabled over a long period of time, they may not be able to obtain a 35-year employment history by the time they retire.

Decisions today can affect SSI earnings in future in Pennsylvania

Most people do not spend too much time thinking about Social Security until the last minute when they are close to retiring. However, there are many decisions that a person makes during his or her working years that can significantly affect how much money one will receive from Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Making the wrong decisions can result in a lower amount on a person’s monthly check for SSI during retirement in Pennsylvania or any other state.

One mistake people make is to work less than 35 years. This can be a noticeable difference since the amount of benefits received from Social Security is based upon the 35 years in which one earns the most income. In other words, each year with higher earnings will cancel out a year with less earnings. Therefore, working for less than 35 years will cause years with no earnings to be factored into calculating benefits.

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